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Ruland SP-63-F Two-Piece Clamping Shaft Collar, Black Oxide Stee

$116

Ruland SP-63-F Two-Piece Clamping Shaft Collar, Black Oxide Stee

Product description

This Ruland two-piece clamping shaft collar is made of black oxide steel. It is a two-piece clamping shaft collar for applications requiring a stronger holding power and higher axial load capacity than setscrew or one-piece clamping collars. The two-piece design separates into two halves, allowing installation or repositioning anywhere on the shaft without disturbing existing components. It accommodates a greater variety of shaft diameters than setscrew collars and is effective on both hard and soft shafts. It is made of steel for weldability and rust resistance with a black oxide finish for a decorative appearance and resistance to white corrosion, chipping and flaking, and stick-slip of the screw during torqueing, improving the collar's grip on the shaft. Black oxide also provides mild corrosion resistance and improved lubricity. This collar comes with forged socket-head cap screws for securing the collar onto the shaft. The operating temperatures for this collar range from -40 to 176 degrees C (-40 to 350 degrees F). This shaft collar is suitable for use in various applications, including in the automotive industry to situate components in automobile power steering assemblies, the manufacturing industry to locate components on a conveyor belt system, and the hobby craft industry to hold wheels on axles in remote control vehicles, among others.

Shaft collars are ring-shaped devices primarily used to secure components onto shafts. They also serve as locators, mechanical stops, and spacers between other components. The two basic types of shaft collars are clamping (or split) collars, which come in one- or two-piece designs, and setscrew collars. In both types, one or more screws hold the collars in place on the shaft. In setscrew collars, screws are tightened through the collar until they press directly against the shaft, and in clamping collars, screws are tightened to uniformly compress the collar around the shaft without impinging or marring it. Setscrew collars and one-piece clamping collars must be installed by sliding the collar over the end of the shaft, while two-piece clamping collars separate into two halves and can be installed between components on the shaft. Shaft collars are made from a wide range of materials including zinc-plated steel, aluminum, nylon, and neoprene. Found in nearly every type of machinery and industry, shaft collars are used in applications including gearbox assemblies, motor bases, machine tools, drive shafts, agricultural implements, medical equipment, and paper and steel mill equipment, among others.

Ruland manufactures shaft collars, rigid couplings, and zero-backlash motion control couplings including beam couplings, bellows couplings, Oldham couplings, curved jaw couplings, and miniature disc couplings. The company, founded in 1937, and headquartered in Marlborough, MA, complies with Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) and Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) standards.

Ruland SP-63-F Two-Piece Clamping Shaft Collar, Black Oxide Stee

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